Taste the Soul of Peru at World of Coffee

With each drop, Peruvian coffee tells the story of the land where it grows and the hands that tend it.

With principal markets including the United States, Canada, Germany, Belgium, and Sweden, Peruvian coffee has displayed sustained growth around the world year after year. And in recent times, markets such as China, Colombia, Panama, Finland, and the United Arab Emirates have also shown tremendous interest in this product from Peru.

According to International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements (IFOAM), Peru is recognized as the world’s third largest producer of organic coffee and occupies fourth place for production with sustainable certification—an advantageous position from which to promote specialty coffees.

In 2018, Peruvian coffee exports reached a total FOB value of US$682 million.  Peru’s coffee exports consist of 80 percent conventional, 17 percent certified, and 3 percent specialty. Regardless of its certification, Peruvian specialty coffee registers high cupping scores under international quality assessment systems that comply with SCA parameters. Overall coffee production has been growing consistently, at an annual rate of five percent between 2015 and 2018.

In an effort coordinated with participants along the coffee production and marketing chain to consolidate and promote Peruvian coffee in its main markets and to enter new ones, the Peruvian Government recently created the Coffees of Peru brand. The campaign highlights the diversity, specialty, and origin of the beverage, and positions Peru as a coffee growing country capable of producing the world’s finest and select varieties.

We draw on the product and talent of our producers and baristas. The proof: our coffees have achieved cupping scores of up to 91 points. These beverages are capable of transporting us to a world of unique flavors.

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“Regardless of its certification, Peruvian specialty coffee registers high cupping scores under international quality assessment systems that comply with SCA parameters.”

ORIGIN, DIVERSITY, SPECIALTY

The coffee bean reached Peru hundreds of years ago and adapted so easily that the soils of our country might just as well have been waiting to adopt it. As the years passed, the plantations spread from north to south among the green slopes of the Andes mountain range at ideal elevations, which, when added to favorable climatic conditions, result in high quality coffees that captivate the palates of consumers seeking unique sensory experiences.

Peruvian producers hold various certifications that guarantee traceability and compliance with the criteria set by the most demanding markets. The list includes Wilson, Vicentina, Juan, Dwight, and Esperanza. 

In 2010, Tunki coffee was named the best organic coffee in the world. Behind this product is the effort and dedication of Wilson Sucaticona at his Tunkimayo farm in Puno’s Sandia Valley, where, following the teachings of his father, he oversees first the coffee growing process, and then the harvest.

From Alto Inambari, in the province of Sandia, department of Puno—and at an elevation of 2400 meters—Vicentina Phocco Palero is a worthy representative of women in coffee. Vicentina and her family dedicated themselves to coffee following a series of earlier setbacks. The efforts paid off, and at the Global Specialty Coffee EXPO Seattle 2018 her coffee was chosen as the best quality in a contest organized by the Association of Small Producers (SPP). Vicentina produces Catimor, Typica, Pache, and Bourbon coffee varieties and has achieved 88.5 cupping points. 

In 2017, a producer from Catamarca, Juan Heredia Sánchez, was the winner of the first edition of the Cup of Excellence held in Peru, achieving 92.25 cupping points for his caturra bourbon variety coffee. To continue offering high quality coffee, Juan reinvested the proceeds of the award in improvements to his farm, known as La Flor del Norte, and located at Huabal, in the province of Jaén (Cajamarca).

Dwight Aguilar Macias harvests coffee on his Nueva Alianza family farm in the Santa Teresa district of La Convención province (Cusco). This young man, who dreamed of becoming an agricultural engineer, won first place in the 2018 Cup of Excellence Competition. His Geisha variety coffee, caramelized, smooth, with aromas of dried fruits and red fruits, achieved 91.08 cupping points.

In April 2019, coffee grower Esperanza Dionisio became the inaugural “sustainability champion” of the Specialty Coffee Association (SCA). This award recognizes Esperanza's efforts in support of sustainable growth for the coffee industry. In 2018, Esperanza had become the first woman to take over management of one of the country’s coffee cooperatives, located at Pangoa, in the province of Satipo (Junín).

Since 2018 Peru has had a National Plan of Action for Peruvian Coffee (PNA Café), an initiative led by the Ministry of Agriculture and the National Coffee Council that aims to raise social, economic, and environmental performance in the sector and help improve the producers’ way of life.

PNA Café promotes the association of agricultural producers; increases productivity, competitiveness and sustainability in agricultural production; and widens market access for agricultural producers. The plan seeks to have Peru become a producer, an exporter, and a consumer of quality coffee by 2030.

Learn more about Peruvian coffee at cafesdelperu.com.

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“The campaign highlights the diversity, specialty, and origin of the beverage, and positions Peru as a coffee growing country capable of producing the world’s finest and select varieties.”

ABOUt peru: useful DATA

  • Peru’s coffee producing regions are Amazonas, Ayacucho, Cajamarca, Cusco, Huánuco, Junín, Pasco, Piura, Puno, and San Martín.

  • Peruvian coffee is exclusively of the Arabica type, of which 70% is Typica and 20% is Carurra, with the remaining 10% spread across other varieties.

  • Approximately 75% of Peruvian coffee grows at elevations of between 1,000 and 1,800 meters above sea level.

  • According to the International Coffee Organization (ICO), Peru is the 9th largest coffee producing country in the world, with 223,902 families dedicated to the industry.


—- content from our Portrait Country, Peru —-