Jun
5
7:00 PM19:00

World of Coffee Launch Party

This year's World of Coffee Launch Party is taking place on Wednesday 5th June at 19.00 at Dog Tab Berlin (Formerly Stone Brewing). This event is free to attend but pre-registration is a must! Join us for an evening of networking & socializing as we kick off World of Coffee 2019. There will be a cash bar and authentic German food trucks onsite.

Tickets are available here.

View Event →
Jun
6
10:00 AM10:00

Exploring the Extraction of Coffee

This contribution discusses progress on research about extraction of coffee, from the Coffee Excellence Center at the Zurich University of Applied Sciences. Hot water extraction is the final step in the long journey of coffee, before consumption. While such a process might take as little time as few seconds for an espresso and several minutes for a drip brew, it is crucial to the quality of the cup. Here, we will track the extraction on a molecular level, from the first drop to the final cup, and compare the extraction processes of an espresso coffee from a porta filter and a fully automatic machine as well as a drip brew. We will discuss the impact of grind size and temperature on the extraction kinetics of drip brew and espresso coffee, respectively. Such research demonstrates the complexity of the task at hand, but also reveals new insight into this crucial process.

View Event →
Jun
6
10:00 AM10:00

A Successful Case of Grassroots Movement from Brazilian Women in Coffee

With continental dimensions Brazil is considered the most significant world coffee producer. Since the coffee arrival in 1727, it’s generally considered as a men world. However, in the past ten years it’s been proved the importance of women work on the different sectors of the coffee production; in other words, women have finally conquered a proper recognition on the country.
The association (CCRC – Centro Comunitário Rural de Conceição) is located on the municipality of Carangola, Minas Gerais Estate, Brazil. It unites 266 coffee farmers as members as well as 400 people involved on the coffee project. In partnership with the State Ministry of Agriculture, 10 farmers are enrolled in a Quality Certification Programme called Certifica Minas.
All members live in an area between 700 and 1100m high, in very small farms, for Brazilian standards (not bigger than 15 ha), cultivating Arabica Catuaí. They are all family farmers working together during the whole process helping each other as much as possible. Women are responsible for the drying process, just few meters away from their household duties. Most of them are members of the IWCA with which support their training courses.

Category: Trading and Commerce


Room:
Lecture Room 2

View Event →
Jun
6
10:00 AM10:00

Value Chain Data: Everyone is Collecting It, But Who Uses It Well?

The cost of data collection has plummeted in recent years, but more data doesn’t always translate to better decisions and stronger value chains. In this session, representatives from IDH, the sustainable trade initiative, and New Foresight will discuss how companies can use data to design better projects and the Global Coffee Platform will speak to the benefits of common reporting metrics and share insights from their recently launched Coffee Data Project.


Category: Sustainability

Room: Lecture Room 3

View Event →
Jun
6
11:15 AM11:15

An Unequal Pair: Coffee Industry Leaders & Farmers Discuss Their Needs & How to Align Them

With producers facing issues of climate change, migration of the younger generations to urban areas, and fluctuating coffee prices, it has become increasingly difficult for smallholder farmers to be successful and sustainable. It’s been 17 years since the last coffee crisis, and since then the industry has largely failed in making sustainable coffee a reality. Coffee prices are near record lows, over production & deforestation is continuing at a rapid pace, natural resources are being depleted, and youth are losing interest in coffee. The current prospects for farmers and youth are therefore limited. Key sector stakeholders hold the power, what is needed are the insights, experiences on successes and failures, and know-how to tackle these issues and bring focus to the farmers. Speaking with farmers, you learn that family is important; they strive for improved livelihoods through access to markets, valuable trainings, stable organizational structures, and a level playing field.
We are bringing together coffee industry leaders and farmers to discuss these critical issues to find common understandings and a path forward. By developing innovative partnerships that cater for social and environmental values these issues get addressed and opportunities for all stakeholders alike will establish a more sustainable coffee industry.

Category: Sustainability

Room:
Lecture Room 2

Target Audience: Producers and Traders

View Event →
Jun
6
12:30 PM12:30

Modulation of Roasting Profiles

Same coffee, same colour, same roasting time, but different roasting profile shapes: Does it make a difference in the cup?
Which process parameters does one have to control the shape of the roasting curve? How does this influence change in the drying kinetics and hence the chemical composition of the coffee and what is the result in the cupping profile?

Category: Roasting & Retailing

Room:
Lecture Room 1

Target Audience: Roasters and Coffee Enthusiasts

View Event →
Jun
6
12:30 PM12:30

The Kenyan Coffee Revolution: Ndaroini Smallholders Announce New Supply Chain

Kenya is one of the champagne regions of the coffee world – we, coffee professionals and consumers, all love it's unique profiles. Yet, volume output dropped rapidly in recent years and quality Kenyan coffees are becoming scarce. Moreover, through first-hand accounts, smallholders in the Nyeri area feel let down by the current system. A group of fed-up smallholders, from the Ndaroini washing station and Gikanda Cooperative Society Ltd., decided it was time for a change. They are demanding higher prices per kilogram and announce a new transparent supply chain in collaboration with Kenyan-based Rockbern and Dutch green coffee supplier Trabocca. Discover the structure of the Kenyan coffee market, why Kenyan quality has been disappointing and scarce, and which measurements smallholders are taking to improve their situation.

Category: Trading and Commerce

Room:
Lecture Room 2

Target Audience: Roasters, Traders, and Baristas

View Event →
Jun
6
1:45 PM13:45

Specialty Coffee Transaction Guide as a New Price Discover Tool for the Specialty Coffee Industry

There are big questions facing specialty coffee sellers and buyers. According to numerous studies in different coffee-producing countries, prices paid for green specialty coffees often don’t cover the full cost of production, let alone support thriving livelihoods for farmers and their families. Moreover, unless price discovery moves beyond commodity price references, younger farmers cannot expect these prices to evolve in ways that make them excited about remaining in the industry. As such, more and more farms will struggle to find a next generation to take over. This makes buyers increasingly concerned about future supplies of the different coffees that are needed to push the industry forward.

The audience attending this lecture will learn about the inception of and future plans for the Specialty Coffee Transaction Guide which is today a project housed at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. The Guide uses donated contract information about industry pricing behaviors that are anonymized and aggregated to create tables to serve as a guide to help both sellers (producers) and buyers (exporters, importers, roasters) land on pricing that does not rely on the volatile commodity price as a baseline. Leaders creating the guide propose that Specialty coffees are deserving of their own pricing scale and present current industry purchasing behaviors as the basis for that scale. The team responsible for the Guide has plans to expand the pool of data donors to ensure more global representation and to formalize the tool over the next years introducing governance, an advisory board, and securing funding to support its work. Come learn about this exciting new tool for the Specialty Coffee industry.

Category: Sustainability

Room:
Lecture Room 3

Target Audience: Baristas, Producers, Roasters, Traders, Retail Operators, and Coffee Enthusiasts

View Event →
Jun
6
1:45 PM13:45

Design Elements to Create a Brand that Connects to Consumer

Good design communicates a shop’s identity and values in a sensory way that allows people to feel, see and experience it’s brand. It sets the stage for good coffee and great service to be enjoyed and remembered. The third-wave coffee retail experience thrives on intentional creativity, especially when today’s customers are looking for meaning and connection, and so every design detail should be considered. 



From colors and furniture, to bar design and layout, to menu and presentation, we’ll simplify and humanize these design concepts, and consider the various details and their place in coming together to create a coffee shop that connects with your target market, and communicates your brand identity to bring people into an experience and community they’ll connect with longterm.

Category: Roasting and Retailing

Room:
Lecture Room 1

Target Audience: Baristas and Retail Operators

View Event →
Jun
6
1:45 PM13:45

Optimizing Your Green Coffee Buying Lab

Tracing and analyzing quality for a specific batch from origin to cup can be done by businesses of all sizes. But it requires work, sometimes a lot of work. Coffee labs are a cornerstone of many of the processes that generate the information for critical buying decisions and optimizing the way they handle green type can bring big benefits. This means coffee labs are uniquely placed to transform quality control, contract administration and data collection into a strategic advantage.

Simple changes in tracking, cupping, roasting and green grading of coffee samples in and around labs can yield big benefits. Building in-the-flow processes to collect data during daily business is easier than you think. A few simple guidelines can reveal new ways and tools to help follow a sample across your supply chain, compare results and support buying decisions based on reliable and accurate data. New technology and approaches can deliver insights into everything from partners, storage processes, cupping panels and more. You can connect this information to an ERP system for additional benefits. But process changes, plus new inexpensive equipment like your smartphone, means businesses of all sizes can gain the benefits.

Category: Trading and Commerce

Room:
Lecture Room 2

Target Audience: Traders, Producers, Roasters and Retail Operators

View Event →
Jun
7
10:00 AM10:00

Trends in European Coffee Market - Seen from Consumer Perspective

Consumer-driven changes will reshape the global coffee world. To help companies throughout the coffee value chain prepare for the future. We look ten years out at key changes that will stir up the coffee market. We will not provide endless statistics about volumes everyone knows. We want to enter a Ted-style discussion about how Consumer-Driven Changes Will Reshape the coffee World”,, i.e changes in consumer preferences, their perspective on coffee , buying behavior, drinking behavior.

Category: Trading and Commerce.

Room: Lecture Room 3

View Event →
Jun
7
10:00 AM10:00

Boosting Farm Profitability at a Time of Record Low Prices

Global coffee prices are at their lowest levels in more than a decade, and nowhere is this crisis felt more acutely than on the smallholder coffee farms: at current price and productivity levels, many coffee grower incomes do not meet their basic needs.
While most attention has been focused on price mechanisms and premiums, the best lever for improving farm profitability is to increase yields, quality and farming efficiency. Through the adoption of low-cost techniques, many farmers can experience dramatic yield increases. These gains would more than compensate for declining prices. Because global coffee supplies and prices are largely driven by just four countries, production increases elsewhere are needed to meet future demand for unique specialty coffees.
The long-term hope for maximizing the production value of land holdings will require data and research about the interaction between varieties (genetics), the land, agronomic approach, farmer type, and the specific market for the beans are intended: commercial, specialty, or top specialty. The session will also discuss how the coffee industry can help coffee farmers achieve their potential by supporting farmer training and research on improved coffee varieties and improved agronomic approaches.

Category: Sustainability

Room:
Lecture Room 2

Target Audience: Roasters, Traders and Producers

View Event →
Jun
7
10:00 AM10:00

Attracting and Retaining Farmworkers – Innovations from Colombia

Skilled farmworkers are necessary to harvest specialty coffees in most parts of the world, but they are too often undervalued and invisible to the industry.

A collaborative and innovative project in Colombia is attracting a dwindling labor force to actively participate in coffee production. Its main objective is to meet the needs of farmworkers, producers, and local organizations, while identifying solutions that will make employment within the coffee industry more socially viable. After a year and half on the ground, this project has seen marked improvements in:

  • Recognition of farmworkers and their contributions to the coffee supply chain.

  • Resource-sharing between coffee producers and farmworkers within the co-op

  • Project design and buy-in from farmworkers themselves.

  • Portfolio of services offered to farmworkers and their families that have given them a sense of job security and peace of mind.

This lecture will present a summary of best practices that have been captured by this project and will guide producers and organizations to make employment within the coffee industry more attractive and socially viable for farmworkers.

Category: Sustainability

Room:
Lecture Room 3

Target Audience: Roasters, Traders and Producers

View Event →
Jun
7
10:00 AM10:00

Climate Hazards and Coffee Investments: What Does a Resilient Sector Look Like?

In this session, we will share the results of a forthcoming publication on the impacts of climate change on coffee and the necessary interventions that can help farmers adapt production systems to build resilient production systems that sustain farmer livelihoods and the environment. The panelists will also discuss finance and investment opportunities for supporting farmers and communities in the transition to more resilient production systems.

Category: Sustainability

Room: Lecture Room 1

View Event →
Jun
7
11:15 AM11:15

Smallholder Coffee Farmers Implementing an Early Warning System for Climate Change

Increasing global temperatures associated with climate change threaten current coffee production in two ways. Coffee production has prospered in the mid altitudes of the humid tropics with moderate temperatures - not too high and not too low – and is found in the hills and mountains of Central America.

Traditionally small farms have faced complex resource allocation decisions of their scarce land, labor and financial capital to meet home consumption and income aspirations dependent on ecosystem services, but also constrained by incomplete information access, including weather, technologies and prices.

Improved integrated crop and farm management capacities and tools to address climate variability as well as price volatility in a context of increasing market, environmental and labor regulations address these challenges which smallholder coffee households face. Using these tools, farm households improve their planning and decision-making capacity to observe and analysis key production and livelihood constraints and opportunities and design risk-reducing management strategies.

In our proposal we address four major issues in adaptation and mitigation of climate change
- lack of weather data to guide improved analysis of production system performance;
- challenges to farm households to integrate diverse single factor production and livelihood recommendations into their field and farm planning and management routine;
- opportunities to strengthen and expand the role of women and the next generation of coffee farmers in the management of more resilient productive and profitable smallholder coffee farms.

Category: Science and Innovation

Room:
Lecture Room 2

Target Audience: Traders, Producers, Roasters, Retail Operators, and Coffee Enthusiasts

View Event →
Jun
7
11:15 AM11:15

Understanding Cost of Production Across Latin America

Specialty coffee demands fairer prices for better-quality coffee. But without knowing how much farmers need to spend to produce a pound of coffee, and how this varies across countries and production methods, it’s hard to know what “sustainable prices” really are.

This presentation will uncover what "sustainable pricing" means across six Latin American countries: Colombia, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Peru, Guatemala, and El Salvador. The majority of coffee producers are not aware of exactly how much it costs to produce a kilogram of coffee, leaving them unable to effectively budget and allocate resources throughout the year, keeping them in a continually vulnerable situation. By breaking down the cost structure for the average coffee farmer in each origin, we can begin to uncover what it takes for producers to operate sustainably.

Category: Sustainability

Room:
Lecture Room 3

Target Audience: Baristas, Producers, Traders, Roasters, Retail Operators, and Coffee Enthusiasts

View Event →
Jun
7
11:15 AM11:15

The Science of Coffee Freshness

Coffee freshness is one of the core values of high-quality specialty coffee. But why is preserving freshness so important? To maximize coffee’s potential, it is kept fresh to ensure quality and consistency. Coffee is a highly elusive product – as soon as it is roasted, it already starts to evolve, change and lose its freshness. Research on coffee freshness focuses on two fields related to changes that occur during storage: the chemical changes to coffee aroma and physical changes related to degassing. Both can be linked to loss of freshness. This session will elaborate on how to get the best out of our coffee by understanding the fundamentals of freshness.

Category: Science and Innovation

Room: Lecture Room 1

View Event →
Jun
7
12:30 PM12:30

Global Supply-Demand: The Effect of Low Prices

The supply of coffee has been only mildly affected in the 2018/19 crop year, but 2019/20 almost certainly see a larger supply drop of washed arabica coffees in light of prices trading below cost of production in most producing countries. While Brazil continues to produce high volumes, helped by a favorable currency, the coffee sectors in Ecuador, Costa Rica, Guatemala, El Salvador and Kenya (among other) are threatened.
On the other hand, demand is doing very well. Record exports out of Brazil so far this crop year have not resulted in stock accumulation in destination countries, pointing at above average consumption growth, possibly incentivized by low prices. Where is demand growing?
But for the time being, the world is having a surplus of coffee and exchange-certified stocks are increasing. That may depress prices even more in the short term, as shown by a simple stock -price correlation, before there is a chance of a significant recovery.
In any case, if we continue with a low price trend, the coffee industry will face a large drop in production in mild coffee producing countries, and potentially consumer backlash as we have seen in 2002.

Category: Trading & Commerce

Room:
Lecture Room 1

Target Audience:  Roasters, Traders, Producers, and Coffee Enthusiasts

View Event →
Jun
7
12:30 PM12:30

A Deep Dive into the Production Costs of Ethiopian Coffee Farmers

It's no secret that FOB prices don't tell us the truth about whether we pay fair prices to producers. We have to go deeper if we truly want to figure out if the prices we pay for our green coffee ultimately earn a living for coffee farmers. Together with Sara Morrocchi from Vuna Consulting, we set up a study in order to find out about the costs of productions of farmers in Agaro, West-Ethiopia.

The result is a glimpse into the life of farmers in West-Ethiopia. It’s about farmers who grow some of the world’s most amazing coffees, but actually can not be seen as coffee farmers. The study reveals the gap between expectations and romance of the specialty coffee scene and the sometimes harsh reality of Ethiopian farmers.

I wrote a detailed article about our motivation:
https://www.coffeecircle.com/de/e/are-we-really-paying-fair-prices

Further, you can get a first impression of the results here:
https://www.coffeecircle.com/de/e/fair-coffee-prices-part-2

In the presentation, we want to shed light into the cost structure of our growing partners and the challenge we face in paying truly fair prices. Ethiopia is still among the most challenging countries to source from, so we believe it’s a good example.

Category: Humanities and Social Sciences

Room:
Lecture Room 3

Target Audience: Traders, Roasters and Coffee Enthusiasts

View Event →
Jun
7
1:45 PM13:45

How Growing Coffee Sustainably Can Alleviate Poverty and Protect the Environment

Coffee is the second most sought after commodity next to crude oil, reaching $16 billion in export value in 2016. The coffee sector, which had a retail market value of $200 billion in 2015, employs approximately 125 million people. Grown primarily in developing countries, 80 per cent of coffee production comes from 20 to 25 million smallholder farmers. This is why the State of Sustainability Initiatives (SSI) believes voluntary sustainability standards (VSSs) are crucial to sustainable coffee production. VSSs emerged in the coffee sector over 20 years ago, addressing climate change, biodiversity conservation, poverty alleviation and worker health and safety. This panel discussion will highlight what VSS compliant coffee production entails, which VSSs are having an impact and how companies can make a difference. It will also feature the launch of our Annual Global Market Report: Coffee, which is just one of the reports in our sustainable commodities marketplace series.

Category: Sustainability

Room:
Lecture Room 3

Target Audience: Producers, Traders, and Retail Operators

View Event →
Jun
7
1:45 PM13:45

The Effect of Third Wave Coffee Towards Coffee Farmers' Sovereignty in Indonesia Through Direct Trade

In 2017 I began the journey to develop what would be the best method to tackle basic issues in the coffee farming sector in Indonesia. I wrote an undergraduate thesis about how direct trade has the chance to emancipate the current welfare level in Indonesian coffee farming society. In the middle of the current growth of coffee industry world wide as the global capitalism takes the main position as the hegemony in the trade system, globalization with all the recent development in many sectors. At the end of the day, what can coffee farmers benefit then?
However, I believe that the third wave coffee era leads to growing direct trade movement as the method established by roasters / local coffee shop owners that result further connection and relationship with the coffee farmers. In the case, there is this possibility that direct trade will make the coffee farmers benefit and survive in the industry.

Category: Humanities and Social Sciences

Room:
Lecture Room 2

Target Audience: Roasters, Producers, Traders, and Coffee Enthusiasts

View Event →
Jun
8
10:00 AM10:00

A Sixth Era of Coffee? Specialty and Sustainability in Historical and Anthropological Perspective

This session brings together recent work on the history and anthropology of coffee in the context of a discussion about the role of specialty in rebalancing the fundamentals of the market. Professor Jonathan Morris presents an overview of the history of price volatility across the five eras of coffee history he has identified, with some suggestions as to how this might be resolved in a sixth era as producer countries start consuming their own coffee. Sabine Parrish focuses on Brazil where this has already occurred, discussing the overall growth in consumption, and relating this to a specialty culture that has to operate within constraints imposed by Brazil’s primacy in the field of production.

Category: Humanities and Social Sciences

Room:
Lecture Room 2

Target Audience: Baristas, Roasters, Producers, Traders, Retail Operators, and Coffee Enthusiasts

View Event →
Jun
8
10:00 AM10:00

The Origin of Origins: Ethiopia’s Wild Forest Coffee

This session will introduce the audience to Ethiopian forest coffee.

Coffee originated in the woodlands of Ethiopia, and centuries after it came to be cultivated and consumed around the globe, it still grows wild in its ancestral forests. While this forest coffee has an interesting story and flavor profile, poor processing and a supply chain that mixed it with farm-grown coffee prevented the development of a special market for the forest-grown product.

That is beginning to change. Partnerships for Forests and the nonprofit organization TechnoServe are working to bring attention to high-quality forest coffees from several regions of Ethiopia. The impetus for this effort is to promote environmentally sustainable livelihoods in communities surrounding the forests: if community members receive higher prices for their forest coffee, they will have greater incentives to protect the woodlands. These forests are vitally important ecosystems that also house the genetic stock that the coffee industry will need in order to develop new varieties.

As part of this awareness-building effort, TechnoServe has been mapping Ethiopia’s coffee forests, the cooperatives and washing stations that process and market forest coffee, and it has been developing flavor profiles and origins to help connect roasters and traders to these unique coffees.

Category: Sustainability

Room:
Lecture Room 3

Target Audience: Roasters, Traders, and Coffee Enthusiasts

View Event →
Jun
8
10:00 AM10:00

What's on the Shelves? Unexpected Results from a Study on Coffee Packaging in a Supermarket

Ever wondered what language is used on the packaging to describe the coffee taste? This study provide unexpected insides into sensory language used on coffee packaging in the supermarket. How many different words are used? Are there information provided on the country of origin or whether it is Arabica or Robusta coffee? What you get is a market analysis resulting in insights coming from 602 analyzed coffee packages. You get inspiration for sensory vocabulary to use for your coffee and get a valuable overview about what is on the shelves without going to the supermarket yourself! Take up insights to position you and your coffee better by knowing what's in the market.

Category: Science and Innovation

Room:
Lecture Room 1

Target Audience: Roasters, Traders, and Retail Operators

View Event →
Jun
8
11:15 AM11:15

Negotiating Place and Taste: How Coffee Becomes “Glocal”

Throughout its long history, coffee has been cast in very different roles: exotic beverage, colonial good, global commodity – but also in a staple of the local cuisines of the countries where it was produced. Leaning on an ongoing Sociological study conducted in Paris, we will see how specialty coffee, initially strongly associated with Anglo-Saxon culture in both looks and taste, changes and adapts to the culture of the countries in which it is introduced, and explore what it means for coffee, a global commodity, to become “local”.

We will show that the local specialty coffee market increasingly mobilizes the past and local traditions through aesthetic choices, in what not only allows it to reach a larger audience, but also serves as means to extract and create value, in line with contemporary tendencies in global capitalism. But while the specialty coffee movement may mobilize local traditions and history in its quest to reach a larger following, it also puts at its center the geographical provenance of coffee. We will see that in that sense, this is a “glocal” movement, constantly trying to strike a balance between “origin” and local culture, innovation and tradition.

Category: Humanities and Social Sciences

Room:
Lecture Room 2

Target Audience: Roasters, Retail Operators and Coffee Enthusiasts

View Event →
Jun
8
11:15 AM11:15

Your Coffee Data is Business Intelligence - Use it to Deliver Quality, Consistency and Control Across Your Business

The artisanal customer face of specialty coffee is real and supported by a complex supply chain and highly specialized production. One result, this business creates and collects a lot of information. Understanding what can be collected and how it can help coffee businesses is simpler than people think. It is also the first step towards gaining real benefits.

Business intelligence is already accessible to businesses of all sizes, it is easy to use and inexpensive. It helps remove guesswork for beginners and delivers new insights for experts. Knowing what it is and how it works delivers real value to everyone in the supply chain. This lecture presents, what business intelligence really is in plain language, how coffee professionals can learn, implement and benefit from it and why doing that is more important than ever.

Category: Science and Innovation

Room:
Lecture Room 1

Target Audience: Producers, Baristas, Roasters, Traders and Retail Operators

View Event →
Jun
8
11:15 AM11:15

SCA's Price Crisis Response: How Did We Get Here and How Can We Ensure It Doesn’t Happen Again?

In December of 2018, the SCA launched its Coffee Price Crisis Response Initiative to develop alternative economic models for the specialty coffee sector. During this lecture, representatives from the SCA Sustainability Center and Board of Directors will identify factors that contributed to the wholly unsustainable economic position facing many coffee producers, discuss the limitations of current coffee purchasing practices, and explore actions that industry actors can take to address the crisis in the short term while building a sector that truly benefits the entire value chain in the long term.


Category: Science and Innovation

Room: Lecture Room 3

View Event →
Jun
8
12:30 PM12:30

Domestic Consumption of Specialty Coffee at Origin: A Comparative Study

Oftentimes viewed as a cure-all for low prices, increasing domestic consumption within coffee producing countries is a hot topic for any number of businesses, governments, and producer organizations around the world. That said, increasing consumption of commercial grade coffee may just be putting a bandage over the current price crisis. Apart from solely increasing demand, a focus on specialty consumption can have outsized impacts on the future of coffee and its sustainability worldwide. But the million – or billion – dollar question is: what needs to be in place to enable the growth of specialty coffee consumption within producing countries?

By comparing the current state of domestic (specialty) consumption in Ethiopia, Colombia, and Peru, this lecture will demonstrate different models for increasing specialty consumption and show the positive impact that a focus on high-quality coffee consumption can have on the entire supply chain, particularly the involvement of young people.

Category: Humanities and Social Sciences

Room:
Lecture Room 2

Target Audience: Baristas, Producers, Retail Operators and Coffee Enthusiasts

View Event →
Jun
8
12:30 PM12:30

Decoding the Journey of Coffee from Cherries to Cup

Every cup of coffee has its story. Each step along the coffee value chain is interlinked and can be further optimized to improve the coffee quality. Apart from the inheritance of coffee varieties and terroir, post-harvest coffee processing plays an important role in quality improvement. During this processing, microorganisms and endogenous bean metabolism are involved. Spontaneous coffee fermentations are frequently associated with wild bacteria and yeasts that originate from the processing ecosystem. Whereas the microbial activities could grant a pleasant flavor to the cup, opposite effects can also occur when the fermentations are conducted suboptimally. The coffee seeds remain metabolically active during the entire processing chain, which involves multiple abiotic stresses that could insert compositional changes in the coffee beans.

In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in post-harvest coffee processing methods and their potential to improve the coffee quality. However, it was not yet clear which processing methods or parameters can define the (green) coffee bean composition and sensory profiles. To remediate this knowledge gap, this study aimed at a multiphasic characterization of the post-harvest coffee processing chain in different geographical locations and with different coffee varieties.

Category: Coffee Farming and Processing

Room:
Lecture Room 1

Target Audience: Producers, Baristas, Traders and Coffee Enthusiasts

View Event →
Jun
8
12:30 PM12:30

How Can Coffee Smallholder Producer Organisations Thrive as International Businesses?

There are estimated to be over three million cooperatives worldwide employing 280 million people. Smallholder farmers account for most of the production of the world’s food, and 80% of the world’s coffee. So how can the sector support smallholder producer organisations (SPO) and enable the whole supply chain to thrive?

Twin has produced a report that examines the role of SPOs in the coffee supply chain. It outlines challenges they face and examples of both when they flourish, and when they fail. This session will share key findings from the report and recommendations for industry stakeholders to enable better working relationships and strengthen the future of coffee.

This presentation will reference and reinforce existing evidence showing that effective SPOs can benefit farmers, their communities and the whole coffee sector. It will guide attendees through best practice case studies and include perspectives from both buyers and producers.

The session will demonstrate that every actor in the coffee supply chain has the power to invest in SPOs and their communities while operating in a sustainable way. The coffee sector has the potential to empower smallholder producers and help them become robust and resilient businesses delivering long lasting value to everyone.

Category: Trading and Commerce

Room:
Lecture Room 3

Target Audience: Producers, Traders, Roasters, Retail Operators and Coffee Enthusiasts

View Event →
Jun
8
1:45 PM13:45

Key Factors You Should Consider Before Buying Specialty Coffees in Brazil

Brazil has a leading role on the production side and is the second largest consuming country in the world. A lot has been said about its sustainable practises with regards to environmental and social aspects and, obviously, about the quality of its specialties in the cup. In this lecture, we’ll uncover the main aspects you should consider before buying specialty coffees in Brazil, from selecting the right suppliers, the right region and the ideal coffee profile.

Category: Trading and Commerce

Room:
Lecture Room 3

Target Audience: Baristas, Roasters and Traders

View Event →
Jun
8
1:45 PM13:45

Scaling Your Business for Success – How to Apply Rapid Growth Strategies to Your Business

Steve Jobs once stated, “I’m always amazed how overnight successes take a helluva long time.” Many entrepreneurs have a vision of success and simply need a road map to a as to make their dreams come true. The coffee industry is filled with stories of successful rapid growth including high profile companies such as Starbucks, Costa Coffee and Keurig. There are also many less visible companies that have experienced incredible growth over the years.

This growth didn’t just happen by accident. There are key principles in each of these growth stories by focusing on people, strategy, execution and cash. This seminar will take participants through the importance of each of these aspects and how to achieve results oriented plans.

Understanding and implementing these factors to growth can allow your business to accelerate at a very rapid rate. Some of the companies we will discuss grew rapidly from the start while others were 10-20 years old before they started their rapid growth. It’s never too late to start accelerating your business.

Category: Trading and Commerce

Room:
Lecture Room 1

Target Audience: Producers, Traders, Roasters, and Retail Operators

View Event →
Jun
8
1:45 PM13:45

Telling an Authentic Story of Coffee Through Photo-Voice

The story of coffee and those who grow it is increasingly important for consumers to know. How do you strike a balance between telling that coffee story well and being authentic?

To change how we share the story of coffee, we explored the photo-voice approach by giving coffee farmers digital cameras and asking them to answer a series of questions by taking photographs. This led to incredible discussions and stories that we might otherwise never have heard or thought of asking about. Photo-Voice gave farmers the opportunity to share their lived experiences using their own voice. What started with a social scientist employing photo-voice for research purposes within a coffee growing community in Burundi, led to a new way of engaging with coffee farmers and sharing their stories. We will share the approach and results of this, and the things we learned along the way – including the mistakes made and surprising benefits of learning from this.

This is a combined lecture with Milda Rosenberg (a researcher) and Robyn-Leigh van Laren (a story team representative of a Burundian coffee producer). We aim to link this talk to an exhibition of selected photos and stories in an interactive social setting.

Category: Humanities and Social Sciences

Room:
Lecture Room 2

Target Audience: Producers, Baristas, Roasters, Traders, Retail Operators, Coffee Enthusiasts

View Event →