Friday

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Jun
7
3:45 PM15:45

Lavazza Foundation Presentation & Reception

From Brazil to Colombia: A Journey with Local Farmers and Agronomists Through Sustainable Coffee Project.

An overview of the Lavazza Foundation and the sustainability projects approach. The discussion will focus on the Lambari project and the capacity to adapt livelihoods and production systems to climate change. It will also explore of the area of Lambari, located in the state of Minas Gerais, the largest coffee producing state in Brazil. Since 2010, the Lavazza Foundation in partnership with Hanss R. Neumann Stiftung, has been managing a sustainability project to contribute to increase the income of small-scale coffee farmers, supporting climate change adaptation and good agricultural practices.
There will be further exploration of Colombia in the department of Meta. Since 2013, this area is part of the government program of “Lands restitution” where empty plots of lands are been reassigned and given back to displaced peasant families. Farmers are slowly coming back so this region will recover the once lost life. The presentation will illustrate the achievements and challenges that coffee farmers in the Meta department are facing every day. The presentation will conclude with a deep dive on how the collaboration with Rainforest Alliance has positively impacted both communities in Brazil and Colombia, creating sustainable working conditions and raising the coffee quality as well as the productivity of the plantations through sustainable cultivation standards.

Location: Lecture Room 1

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Jun
7
1:45 PM13:45

The Effect of Third Wave Coffee Towards Coffee Farmers' Sovereignty in Indonesia Through Direct Trade

In 2017 I began the journey to develop what would be the best method to tackle basic issues in the coffee farming sector in Indonesia. I wrote an undergraduate thesis about how direct trade has the chance to emancipate the current welfare level in Indonesian coffee farming society. In the middle of the current growth of coffee industry world wide as the global capitalism takes the main position as the hegemony in the trade system, globalization with all the recent development in many sectors. At the end of the day, what can coffee farmers benefit then?
However, I believe that the third wave coffee era leads to growing direct trade movement as the method established by roasters / local coffee shop owners that result further connection and relationship with the coffee farmers. In the case, there is this possibility that direct trade will make the coffee farmers benefit and survive in the industry.

Category: Humanities and Social Sciences

Room:
Lecture Room 2

Target Audience: Roasters, Producers, Traders, and Coffee Enthusiasts

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Jun
7
1:45 PM13:45

How Growing Coffee Sustainably Can Alleviate Poverty and Protect the Environment

Coffee is the second most sought after commodity next to crude oil, reaching $16 billion in export value in 2016. The coffee sector, which had a retail market value of $200 billion in 2015, employs approximately 125 million people. Grown primarily in developing countries, 80 per cent of coffee production comes from 20 to 25 million smallholder farmers. This is why the State of Sustainability Initiatives (SSI) believes voluntary sustainability standards (VSSs) are crucial to sustainable coffee production. VSSs emerged in the coffee sector over 20 years ago, addressing climate change, biodiversity conservation, poverty alleviation and worker health and safety. This panel discussion will highlight what VSS compliant coffee production entails, which VSSs are having an impact and how companies can make a difference. It will also feature the launch of our Annual Global Market Report: Coffee, which is just one of the reports in our sustainable commodities marketplace series.

Category: Sustainability

Room:
Lecture Room 3

Target Audience: Producers, Traders, and Retail Operators

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Jun
7
12:30 PM12:30

Attracting and Retaining Farmworkers – Innovations from Colombia

Skilled farmworkers are necessary to harvest specialty coffees in most parts of the world, but they are too often undervalued and invisible to the industry.

A collaborative and innovative project in Colombia is attracting a dwindling labor force to actively participate in coffee production. Its main objective is to meet the needs of farmworkers, producers, and local organizations, while identifying solutions that will make employment within the coffee industry more socially viable. After a year and half on the ground, this project has seen marked improvements in:

  • Recognition of farmworkers and their contributions to the coffee supply chain.

  • Resource-sharing between coffee producers and farmworkers within the co-op

  • Project design and buy-in from farmworkers themselves.

  • Portfolio of services offered to farmworkers and their families that have given them a sense of job security and peace of mind.

This lecture will present a summary of best practices that have been captured by this project and will guide producers and organizations to make employment within the coffee industry more attractive and socially viable for farmworkers.

Category: Sustainability

Room:
Lecture Room 2

Target Audience: Roasters, Traders and Producers

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Jun
7
12:30 PM12:30

A Deep Dive into the Production Costs of Ethiopian Coffee Farmers

It's no secret that FOB prices don't tell us the truth about whether we pay fair prices to producers. We have to go deeper if we truly want to figure out if the prices we pay for our green coffee ultimately earn a living for coffee farmers. Together with Sara Morrocchi from Vuna Consulting, we set up a study in order to find out about the costs of productions of farmers in Agaro, West-Ethiopia.

The result is a glimpse into the life of farmers in West-Ethiopia. It’s about farmers who grow some of the world’s most amazing coffees, but actually can not be seen as coffee farmers. The study reveals the gap between expectations and romance of the specialty coffee scene and the sometimes harsh reality of Ethiopian farmers.

I wrote a detailed article about our motivation:
https://www.coffeecircle.com/de/e/are-we-really-paying-fair-prices

Further, you can get a first impression of the results here:
https://www.coffeecircle.com/de/e/fair-coffee-prices-part-2

In the presentation, we want to shed light into the cost structure of our growing partners and the challenge we face in paying truly fair prices. Ethiopia is still among the most challenging countries to source from, so we believe it’s a good example.

Category: Humanities and Social Sciences

Room:
Lecture Room 3

Target Audience: Traders, Roasters and Coffee Enthusiasts

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Jun
7
12:30 PM12:30

Global Supply-Demand: The Effect of Low Prices

The supply of coffee has been only mildly affected in the 2018/19 crop year, but 2019/20 almost certainly see a larger supply drop of washed arabica coffees in light of prices trading below cost of production in most producing countries. While Brazil continues to produce high volumes, helped by a favorable currency, the coffee sectors in Ecuador, Costa Rica, Guatemala, El Salvador and Kenya (among other) are threatened.
On the other hand, demand is doing very well. Record exports out of Brazil so far this crop year have not resulted in stock accumulation in destination countries, pointing at above average consumption growth, possibly incentivized by low prices. Where is demand growing?
But for the time being, the world is having a surplus of coffee and exchange-certified stocks are increasing. That may depress prices even more in the short term, as shown by a simple stock -price correlation, before there is a chance of a significant recovery.
In any case, if we continue with a low price trend, the coffee industry will face a large drop in production in mild coffee producing countries, and potentially consumer backlash as we have seen in 2002.

Category: Trading & Commerce

Room:
Lecture Room 1

Target Audience:  Roasters, Traders, Producers, and Coffee Enthusiasts

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Jun
7
11:15 AM11:15

The Science of Coffee Freshness

Coffee freshness is one of the core values of high-quality specialty coffee. But why is preserving freshness so important? To maximize coffee’s potential, it is kept fresh to ensure quality and consistency. Coffee is a highly elusive product – as soon as it is roasted, it already starts to evolve, change and lose its freshness. Research on coffee freshness focuses on two fields related to changes that occur during storage: the chemical changes to coffee aroma and physical changes related to degassing. Both can be linked to loss of freshness. This session will elaborate on how to get the best out of our coffee by understanding the fundamentals of freshness.

Category: Science and Innovation

Room: Lecture Room 1

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Jun
7
11:15 AM11:15

Understanding Cost of Production Across Latin America

Specialty coffee demands fairer prices for better-quality coffee. But without knowing how much farmers need to spend to produce a pound of coffee, and how this varies across countries and production methods, it’s hard to know what “sustainable prices” really are.

This presentation will uncover what "sustainable pricing" means across six Latin American countries: Colombia, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Peru, Guatemala, and El Salvador. The majority of coffee producers are not aware of exactly how much it costs to produce a kilogram of coffee, leaving them unable to effectively budget and allocate resources throughout the year, keeping them in a continually vulnerable situation. By breaking down the cost structure for the average coffee farmer in each origin, we can begin to uncover what it takes for producers to operate sustainably.

Category: Sustainability

Room:
Lecture Room 3

Target Audience: Baristas, Producers, Traders, Roasters, Retail Operators, and Coffee Enthusiasts

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Jun
7
11:15 AM11:15

Smallholder Coffee Farmers Implementing an Early Warning System for Climate Change

Increasing global temperatures associated with climate change threaten current coffee production in two ways. Coffee production has prospered in the mid altitudes of the humid tropics with moderate temperatures - not too high and not too low – and is found in the hills and mountains of Central America.

Traditionally small farms have faced complex resource allocation decisions of their scarce land, labor and financial capital to meet home consumption and income aspirations dependent on ecosystem services, but also constrained by incomplete information access, including weather, technologies and prices.

Improved integrated crop and farm management capacities and tools to address climate variability as well as price volatility in a context of increasing market, environmental and labor regulations address these challenges which smallholder coffee households face. Using these tools, farm households improve their planning and decision-making capacity to observe and analysis key production and livelihood constraints and opportunities and design risk-reducing management strategies.

In our proposal we address four major issues in adaptation and mitigation of climate change
- lack of weather data to guide improved analysis of production system performance;
- challenges to farm households to integrate diverse single factor production and livelihood recommendations into their field and farm planning and management routine;
- opportunities to strengthen and expand the role of women and the next generation of coffee farmers in the management of more resilient productive and profitable smallholder coffee farms.

Category: Science and Innovation

Room:
Lecture Room 2

Target Audience: Traders, Producers, Roasters, Retail Operators, and Coffee Enthusiasts

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Jun
7
10:00 AM10:00

Climate Hazards and Coffee Investments: What Does a Resilient Sector Look Like?

In this session, we will share the results of a forthcoming publication on the impacts of climate change on coffee and the necessary interventions that can help farmers adapt production systems to build resilient production systems that sustain farmer livelihoods and the environment. The panelists will also discuss finance and investment opportunities for supporting farmers and communities in the transition to more resilient production systems.

Category: Sustainability

Room: Lecture Room 1

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Jun
7
10:00 AM10:00

Cupping Room Sessions

For the full schedule of sessions across all three days at World of Coffee, click here.

Room 1

  • 10:00 - 11:00 | Trabocca

  • 11:30 - 12:30 | Qima Coffee

  • 13:00 - 14:00 | Kaffee Siddhartha GmbH

  • 14:30 - 15:30 | Colombian Spirit

  • 16:00 - 17:00 | Amsterdam Coffee Lab / WB.coffee

Room 2

  • 10:00 - 11:00 | Fairtrade

  • 11:30 - 12:30 | La Minita Coffee

  • 13:00 - 14:00 | Falcon Coffees

  • 14:30 - 15:30 | African Fine Coffees Association (AFCA)

  • 16:00 - 17:00 | Portrait Country: Peru

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Jun
7
10:00 AM10:00

Boosting Farm Profitability at a Time of Record Low Prices

Global coffee prices are at their lowest levels in more than a decade, and nowhere is this crisis felt more acutely than on the smallholder coffee farms: at current price and productivity levels, many coffee grower incomes do not meet their basic needs.
While most attention has been focused on price mechanisms and premiums, the best lever for improving farm profitability is to increase yields, quality and farming efficiency. Through the adoption of low-cost techniques, many farmers can experience dramatic yield increases. These gains would more than compensate for declining prices. Because global coffee supplies and prices are largely driven by just four countries, production increases elsewhere are needed to meet future demand for unique specialty coffees.
The long-term hope for maximizing the production value of land holdings will require data and research about the interaction between varieties (genetics), the land, agronomic approach, farmer type, and the specific market for the beans are intended: commercial, specialty, or top specialty. The session will also discuss how the coffee industry can help coffee farmers achieve their potential by supporting farmer training and research on improved coffee varieties and improved agronomic approaches.

Category: Sustainability

Room:
Lecture Room 2

Target Audience: Roasters, Traders and Producers

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Jun
7
10:00 AM10:00

Trends in European Coffee Market - Seen from Consumer Perspective

Consumer-driven changes will reshape the global coffee world. To help companies throughout the coffee value chain prepare for the future. We look ten years out at key changes that will stir up the coffee market. We will not provide endless statistics about volumes everyone knows. We want to enter a Ted-style discussion about how Consumer-Driven Changes Will Reshape the coffee World”,, i.e changes in consumer preferences, their perspective on coffee , buying behavior, drinking behavior.

Category: Trading and Commerce.

Room: Lecture Room 3

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